Diary SiteMap RecentChanges About Contact Calendar

Search:

Matching Pages:

Web

Last edit

Geändert: 2c2

< &lt;journal "^\d\d\d\d-\d\d-\d\d.*Web"&gt;

stattdessen:

> <journal search tag:web>


Stuff about the world wide web (WWW): Structure, history, weirdness.

2013-08-25 Safe Browsing

Today I installed HttpFox, an extension for Firefox which tells me which resources have been requested, what the responses where and so on. I noticed that I got a request for safebrowsing.clients.google.com. Hm. I checked Google Safe Browsing and wondered. I decided to deactivate it. Visit about:config and search for safebrowsing*enabled and set them all to false.

What do you think—overreaction? I didn’t find it on the EFF site. I wonder why.

Tags: RSS

Comments on 2013-08-25 Safe Browsing

Last edit

Summary: The first time I actually saw "google safe browsing", I thought "what an excellent idea!" – and then I realized that the name is very misleading, and that it actually does the completely opposite thing…

No diff available.

The first time I actually saw “google safe browsing”, I thought “what an excellent idea!” – and then I realized that the name is very misleading, and that it actually does the completely opposite thing…

Radomir Dopieralski 2013-08-26 08:23 UTC

Add Comment

2013-08-15 Webhosting in Switzerland

I’m considering the move of my web space to Switzerland. Any recommendations?

I’ve had the following recommendations:

  • Geekserver by Cyon at 39.–/month (25 GB disk, 1 GB RAM, 1 TB traffic, Debian)
  • Virtual Private Server by hostfactory at 24.10/month (20 GB disk, 512 MB RAM, unknown traffic, Debian), increase to 31.70/month (25 GB disk, 1 GB RAM, unknown traffic, Debian)
  • VRS Micro by EDIS at 1.45€/month (2 GB disk, 256 RAM, 0.5 TB traffic , Debian), increase to 8.00€/month for Basic (24 GB disk, 1 GB RAM, 4 TB traffic, Debian)

Currently 1.00 CHF is about 1.07 USD, apparently.

Tags: RSS

Comments on 2013-08-15 Webhosting in Switzerland

Last edit

Summary: Removed what looks like spam

Changed:

< ----
< [[gravatar:http://www.hostingliste.ch Grevo:a700648792bb5bf5d05b9869b825ec56]]
< Here you can find a list of Webhosting in Switzerland: http://www.hostingliste.ch/webhosting-vergleich
< -- [http://www.hostingliste.ch Grevo] 2013-10-15 15:40 UTC
< ----
< [[gravatar:http://www.marchionni.ch Eric:eed4a6999a408c09b3bb4eba41d37ad9]]
< Alex, what's your plan for the Swiss web hosting? For a simple, low traffic blog one of these shared hosting will be enough: http://www.marchionni.ch/webhosting/
< I try to keep the list updated and I'm using almost all of them to
this day. Should write a review of each though.
< But if you're looking for a high performance Ecommerce or Typo3 hosting
, I highly recommend http://www.trendhosting.ch/
< I
'm not affiliated with them, just a very happy client. Credit where credit is due, I cannot speak highly enough of them!
< -- [http://www.marchionni
.ch Eric] 2014-02-21 18:44 UTC

to

> *Update*: As this page seems to attract spammers, I've locked it.


looks very expensive ….http://www.edis.at/en/server/linux-vserver/switzerland/ and http://www.edis.at/en/server/kvm-vps/switzerland/

– Pierre Gaston 2013-08-20 10:29 UTC



AlexSchroeder
Thanks! I need to investigate which servers are 100% under Swiss law. It’s something I’d be interested in.

AlexSchroeder 2013-08-20 21:59 UTC

Update: As this page seems to attract spammers, I’ve locked it.

Add Comment

2013-07-30 Politics

Looking back at how things have gone in the last year I’d say that all my RPG conversation has moved to Google+ and this wiki-blog has turned into a repository of things I don’t want to loose when Google+ is shut down. All my political thoughts are on Twitter: @kensanata and I’m almost exclusively expressing myself via retweets. I’m also more than happy to talk about it on Twitter.

I post my pictures on Flickr at kensanata for myself and cross-post them to Facebook and a protected Twitter channel for the various family members out there.

Tags: RSS RSS RSS RSS RSS

Comments on 2013-07-30 Politics

Last edit

No diff available.

Add Comment

2013-04-13 Garamond

I like the Garamond font. This website uses it. Here’s how:

@font-face {
      font-family: 'Garamond';
      font-style: normal;
      font-weight: 400;
      src: local('Garamond'), local('GaramondNo8'), local('EB Garamond'), local('EBGaramond'), url(https://themes.googleusercontent.com/static/fonts/ebgaramond/v4/kYZt1bJ8UsGAPRGnkXPeFdIh4imgI8P11RFo6YPCPC0.woff) format('woff');
}

body, rss {
    font-family: Garamond, serif;
    font-size: 16pt;
    line-height: 20pt;
    margin:1em 3em;
    padding:0;
}

As you can see, if you have a font called Garamond, Garamond No. 8 or EB Garamond installed, then the web page will use it. Garamond No. 8 is what I use on my GNU/Linux system. If you don’t have any of them, it will download the EB Garamond files from Google Web Fonts.

I hope it works. Thoughts?

Tags: RSS

Comments on 2013-04-13 Garamond

Last edit

Summary: Well, I looked at mod_expire and added the following to my .htaccess file: …

Added:

> At first, this is what I had installed:
> {{{
> @font-face {
> font-family: 'EB Garamond';
> src: url('http://campaignwiki.org/EBGaramond12-Regular.otf'); /* For IE */
> src: local('EB Garamond'),
> url('http://campaignwiki.org/EBGaramond12-Regular.ttf') format('truetype');
> }
> body, rss {
> font-family: Garamond, GaramondNo8, "EB Garamond", serif;
> font-size: 16pt;
> line-height: 20pt;
> margin:1em 3em;
> padding:0;
> }
> }}}
> My original reaction:



AlexSchroeder
At first, this is what I had installed:

@font-face {
    font-family: 'EB Garamond';
    src: url('http://campaignwiki.org/EBGaramond12-Regular.otf'); /* For IE */
    src: local('EB Garamond'),
    url('http://campaignwiki.org/EBGaramond12-Regular.ttf') format('truetype');
}

body, rss {
    font-family: Garamond, GaramondNo8, "EB Garamond", serif;
    font-size: 16pt;
    line-height: 20pt;
    margin:1em 3em;
    padding:0;
}

My original reaction: Ugh, now that I’m back in the office and sitting at a Windows machine using Firefox, I notice a delay between page load and text display. In fact, monospaced text uses a different font and is displayed immediately. Ordinary text using Garamond gets shown with a delay of a few moments. I just checked and it seems that I have Garamond installed. Why the delay?

AlexSchroeder 2013-04-15 06:46 UTC



AlexSchroeder
Well, I looked at mod_expire and added the following to my .htaccess file:

ExpiresActive On
ExpiresDefault "access plus 1 hours"
ExpiresByType application/x-font-ttf "access plus 1 years"
ExpiresByType application/vnd.ms-fontobject "access plus 1 years"

FileETag none

AddType application/vnd.ms-fontobject .eot
AddType application/x-font-ttf        .ttf

To no avail! :(

Looking back, I see what went wrong: the font is being loaded from a different domain. I was updating the wrong file.

Then I remembered that Google also hosts EB Garamond. They provide a link to a CSS fragment which contains the @font-face instruction. I added the following to my CSS file:

@font-face {
      font-family: 'EB Garamond';
      font-style: normal;
      font-weight: 400;
      src: local('EB Garamond'), local('EBGaramond'), url(https://themes.googleusercontent.com/static/fonts/ebgaramond/v4/kYZt1bJ8UsGAPRGnkXPeFdIh4imgI8P11RFo6YPCPC0.woff) format('woff');
}

body, rss {
    font-family: Garamond, GaramondNo8, "EB Garamond", serif;
    font-size: 16pt;
    line-height: 20pt;
    margin:1em 3em;
    padding:0;
}

I looked at the page headers being sent back and forth using the Firefox Live Headers extension and saw that the font is requested (even though I think the browser will be using the local font instead) – but at least the server now replies with a 304 Not Modified status.

Time passes…

Finally I understand what’s wrong! I need to list the alternative local names within the @font-face declaration! With the following setup, I can see that no remote font is loaded.

@font-face {
      font-family: 'Garamond';
      font-style: normal;
      font-weight: 400;
      src: local('Garamond'), local('GaramondNo8'), local('EB Garamond'), local('EBGaramond'), url(https://themes.googleusercontent.com/static/fonts/ebgaramond/v4/kYZt1bJ8UsGAPRGnkXPeFdIh4imgI8P11RFo6YPCPC0.woff) format('woff');
}

body, rss {
    font-family: Garamond, serif;
    font-size: 16pt;
    line-height: 20pt;
    margin:1em 3em;
    padding:0;
}

AlexSchroeder 2013-04-15

Add Comment

2013-03-14 Google Reader Alternative

Google Reader is being axed. I used it every day.

Evan Prodromou says on Google+
Why, it’s almost as if it would be in your best interest to run network services under your own control instead of using quote-unquote free ones run by someone whose priorities are not aligned with yours.

I might consider it. Years ago, I used rss2email by Aaron Swartz. The irony is that I’ll be reading my blog posts—in Gmail! X(

There are other alternatives. Here’s a crowdsourced list. I see that The Old Reader, for example. “It’s just like the old Google reader, only better.” Here’s a warning sign, however: “We’re in beta right now […]” Will it cost money eventually? How much? I’m not opposed to paying a little money. After all, I want the service to have a future.

Me on Twitter
I read a rant once saying: “Please, services on the Internet, take my money! I want you to have a decent business plan!”

So, run a network service under my own control, or pay somebody else…

As for running something under my own control, I must confess that I’m still averse to running PHP and MySQL on a server of mine. Somehow I keep thinking of the combination as insecure. I downloaded Tiny Tiny RSS and looked at it (also on GitHub).

There is also something about RSS that makes me cringe: If every blog reader installs a feed aggregator that checks its feeds every ten minutes, this won’t scale. A few central aggregators that poll feeds and serve their user interface when requested by users seems like a better solution from a technical point of view.

On my portable devices I’m using the Reeder app. Like many others, it depends on Google Reader. We’ll see what its creator will switch to.

Tags: RSS

Comments on 2013-03-14 Google Reader Alternative

Last edit

Summary: Lovers of information now seem to have a tough time with the recent announcement of the closing down of Google reader. However, fans of Google reader can now switch to something new alternatives to Google Reader. I came to across here, http:/how-to.inbest-alternatives-for-google-reader/, with list . . .

Added:

> ----
> [[gravatar: Ellen Paul:f5534c42428310e1f572ccb5dc3f8987]]
> Lovers of information now seem to have a tough time with the recent announcement of the closing down of Google reader. However, fans of Google reader can now switch to something new alternatives to Google Reader. I came to across here, http://how-to.in/best-alternatives-for-google-reader/, with list of some alternatives of it, but still can't decide that with whom should I go for best result. Now, here its a brief description about some other alternatives, so now its not a very much difficult task for me. Thanks for helping out on above topic.
> -- Ellen Paul 2013-03-22 06:17 UTC



greywulf
I’m looking at both The Old Reader and NetVibes as alternatives. Like many people, I stopped using Google Reader itself to read my Google feeds long ago - on my Desktop I use Nextgen Reader for Windows 8 and I use Flipboard on my Android phone. Killing Google Reader effectively kills those apps dead unless they switch to an alternative API provider, and quick. I am guessing that NetVibes will pick up a lot of the slack and reach out to the Google Reader ecosystem.

greywulf 2013-03-14 10:48 UTC



AlexSchroeder
Hm, there’s definitely a difference between API providers and actual user interface providers.

Jorgen Schäfer on Google+
I generally take pretty badly to getting a “HERE BUY OUR STUFF” shoved into my face. Netvibes does that in a most annoying fashion. So much actually that I didn’t even try it. I’m not interested in constantly getting told that I totally should buy a product, and the screenshots were not really exciting, either. Also, dark background? Seriously?

I wonder… I must say that The Old Reader has a certain nostalgia going for it, haha.

AlexSchroeder 2013-03-14 11:20 UTC



Josh Tolle
This means I will either convert over to gwene (and consume through a news reader) or I’ll write something for myself. I’m leaning toward writing something.

– Josh Tolle 2013-03-14 12:47 UTC



AlexSchroeder
Wow, gwene looks interesting. It appeals to my Emacs and Gnus sensibilities. :) Unfortunately, it doesn’t quite solve the “reading from multiple devices” problem. I’d also have to find an iOS app that uses NNTP.

AlexSchroeder 2013-03-14 12:58 UTC



aaditya
For an online reader I’ve been pretty happy with newsblur.com

aaditya 2013-03-16 06:37 UTC



AlexSchroeder
Hm, TT RSS apparently has an iPhone and iPad app that allows offline reading. [time passes] Actually, now that I’m looking for it, I can’t find it. I guess it’s vapor ware.

AlexSchroeder 2013-03-16 16:02 UTC



AlexSchroeder
I must admit that reading Three Months to Scale NewsBlur made me feel very sympathetic. I also like that it’s free software. Good call, @aadis. Also, “60,000 new users (from 50,000 users originally).” 8-D

AlexSchroeder 2013-03-18 08:47 UTC



Ellen Paul
Lovers of information now seem to have a tough time with the recent announcement of the closing down of Google reader. However, fans of Google reader can now switch to something new alternatives to Google Reader. I came to across here, http://how-to.in/best-alternatives-for-google-reader/, with list of some alternatives of it, but still can’t decide that with whom should I go for best result. Now, here its a brief description about some other alternatives, so now its not a very much difficult task for me. Thanks for helping out on above topic.

– Ellen Paul 2013-03-22 06:17 UTC

Add Comment

2013-02-01 New Domain

I’m slowly, very slowly, preparing for the separation of Emacs Wiki and my own web presence (this site). Where as Emacs Wiki runs on ThinkMo.de in Germany with excellent uptime costing $20/month, most of my other projects run on Eggplant Farms in the United States. All the old links should still work—I’m a strong believer in Cool URIs don’t change. Just don’t be surprised if you’re being redirected from emacswiki.org/alex to alexschroeder.ch. :)

Let me know if you spot anything that doesn’t work: broken links, missing icons, error messages.

Tags: RSS

Comments on 2013-02-01 New Domain

Last edit

No diff available.

Add Comment

2013-01-23 Security of Code Downloaded from Online Sources

In the anonymous rant The Wikemacs Experiment: 300 Days Later, the author claims “The biggest problem is that it is insecure. […] Anyone can edit any of the pages that contain Elisp code.” The same sentiment was expressed by Alex Bennée in a comment on Google+: “What is really needed is a way to be sure that the source for the emacs extension your updating hasn’t been subverted by someone else with ill intent.”

I said:

Experiences and ideas of “what is really necessary” vary. As for myself, I’ve installed code from all over the Internet without reviewing the source. Installing it from a gist or git repo is hardly a different experience. If you want to figure out whether a source is trustworthy, you do the usual things: do people link to the code, how long has it been around, what about recent checkins, that sort of thing. Or you get into the crypto business of signing releases.

You could of course say that every day that passes without a problem increases our false sense of security… I have no answer to that. All I can say is that if security is your problem, using gists and github is not the solution (as you say yourself). The source of the insecurity is our habits, our culture of downloading and installing anything and everything. I’m not sure how you’ll ever make sure “that the source for the emacs extension your updating hasn’t been subverted by someone else with ill intent.” That seems pretty impossible to me unless you limit yourself to the core Emacs distribution (and even that’s not a guarantee).

People on the #emacs channel keep asking “is there way to do X” and thus my impression is that finding stuff is a more pressing problem. I feel that encouraging people to create a page on the wiki saying “here is code to help you do something” is the solution to that problem.

But then again, I guess we all differ in what we consider to be the most pressing problem.

Alex Bennée the correctly points out that using “a user locked solution like a gist or git repo you can at least be assured what you’re installing has come through one person who you’ve trusted to a degree before.” I guess that’s true. We’ll see whether people start switching over to using gists instead of editing wiki pages. I said in an earlier comment:

I added gist support […] because it was easy to do, not because it will encourage existing authors to move their elisp code on wiki pages to github. If at all, it might encourage future elisp authors to transclude a gist… But then again, there’s nothing preventing them from linking to a gist right now. Perhaps it’s also a generational thing. People that have been living without github and gists don’t feel a particular need to start using it.

Interesting times. :)

Tags: RSS RSS RSS RSS

Comments on 2013-01-23 Security of Code Downloaded from Online Sources

Last edit

Summary: Excellent feature

Added:

> ----
> [[gravatar: AlexSchroeder:e33b88db6bc04e1c93db25c702baea28]]
> Excellent feature!
> -- AlexSchroeder 2013-01-28 07:23 UTC


Hi Alex,

first of all - thank you very much for Oddmuse! I’m using it for both my personal site and Department's site. It has some rough edges, but overall I find it a very nice tool, and I did recommend it to a few people.

Now to the point: I was just wondering whether it might be a good idea to use stackoverflow with [emacs] tag (which you mentioned in your earlier post), or maybe even start something like emacs.stackexchange.com? I’m not sure whether it could solve any problems you mentioned, but (at least for the more paranoia-oriented people) it might feel a bit more secure, with all the comments, up- and downvotes etc. I don’t know. (Personally, I didn’t use any actual code from Emacswiki, but I guess it would not be a huge problem for me.)

mbork 2013-01-23 20:55 UTC



AaronHawley
Nothing has really changed. Previously, Lisp code was shared between a few Emacs hackers and the intention was to work on improving it and get it integrated into Emacs. The GNU Project was the trusted authority. They distributed the useful contributions. Obviously, that hasn’t scaled well. I think it’s perfectly reasonable for Emacs newbies to distrust code they can’t read that was written by hackers they don’t know.

AaronHawley 2013-01-23 21:56 UTC



AlexSchroeder
Thank you for the kind words, Marcin. I think a lot of people are already using Stackoverflow for Emacs questions. I find the site incredibly useful when I’m at work (except my work is hardly ever related to Emacs, unfortunately).

I also agree with Aaron. Good point regarding the GNU Project being the trusted authority.

AlexSchroeder 2013-01-23 22:39 UTC



Thomas Koch
I’ve collected examples of manipulated code or binaries: http://www.koch.ro/blog/index.php?/archives/153-On-distributing-binaries.html

I don’t think that it’s too hard to get a gpg key, go to a signing party on your next software conference and sign all your releases. It’s rather dumb easy. And you can use signed git tags on github or any other git hosting platform to provide a very strong confidence for your user that they can trace you back in case you provided bad code.

Thomas Koch 2013-01-24 12:57 UTC



AlexSchroeder
True, it is not “too hard” for many people. But when I write a little throw-away piece of code like EmacsWiki:1000 Words it’s a bit much to ask. I’ve never been to a key signing party. I never go to software conferences. I post it on the wiki. And when I write another little piece of code, I do it again. That’s why my code ends up on the wiki and not on github. I keep hoping people will volunteer to maintain code I wrote and either add it to Emacs itself or maintain it in decent repositories. I just don’t see myself doing it. I like the division of labor between programming and packaging.

AlexSchroeder 2013-01-25 10:24 UTC



Thomas Koch
It might be a bit too much to sign a little script of 10 lines that I can quickly review. I was rather referring to big software projects. However once you’ve got a gpg key you can sign a small code snippet just as easily as you can sign an email.

Thomas Koch 2013-01-26 10:11 UTC



AlexSchroeder
I think now the discussion turns to the question of where to draw the line. There’s exactly one large project that is exclusively hosted on Emacs Wiki, I think: EmacsWiki:Icicles. Others, such as EmacsWiki:Anything moved to github. Other, like EmacsWiki:Gnus or EmacsWiki:BBDB were never hosted on Emacs Wiki to begin with. Then there are the large collection of inofficial extensions like the ones listed on EmacsWiki:rcirc. Do they count as a single project or is each file a separate one? From my point of view, each one is a separate project. I just use two of them myself. As such, they are not really “a little script of 10 lines” but they don’t feel like big software projects, either.

I think I’m with Aaron. Emacs Wiki mostly hosts code on the wiki that one could view as “incubator” stuff. Things that haven’t made it into their own repositories or that haven’t made it into Emacs itself. Thus, asking for version control and signed releases is—in the context of code hosted on Emacs Wiki—asking for the right thing at the wrong time. It’s premature for those small single file projects that are hanging in Limbo somewhere between ten lines and inclusion into Emacs or indendence as their separate projects.

AlexSchroeder 2013-01-26 11:46 UTC



dim
Using El-Get you can easily add a checksum in your setup so that you only automatically get code from EmacsWiki with that checksum. So if you get to a new machine or re-install your Emacs setup from scratch, and the newly downloaded EmacsWiki code does not match your checksum, El-Get will refuse to load it for you. You can get the checksum interactively using M-x el-get-checksum command.

dim 2013-01-27 21:13 UTC



AlexSchroeder
Excellent feature!

AlexSchroeder 2013-01-28 07:23 UTC

Add Comment

2013-01-08 Online Photos

In 2012, I basically took pictures using Instagram, shared them with Facebook (part of the family), Twitter (another part of the family), Flickr (my favorite), and I used IFTTT to send a copy to Picasa Web because I felt that I’d like to have some pictures for people to see on Google+.

But then, when Instagram changed its terms of service (they rephrased them somewhat) and I decided that I might want to look into using something else for a bit.

I liked the new Flickr app somewhat.

I tried organizing my pictures on Picasa Web but was unable to create a new empty album in order to move some of my pictures in the Scrapbook album. When I selected more than 300 of the pictures and tried to move them, it also told me I could not move more than 100 at a time. I was confused. It looked like the user interface could use some improvements. I even started up my local Picasa copy and wasn’t clear on how to use it to manage my albums online. Perhaps you can’t. I was not impressed. It looks as if I’m not going to abandon iPhoto any time soon. Then again, I really want to abandon iPhoto one of these days because I hate it’s opaque storage regime.

Also, the lens or the protective plastic cover of my iPhone camera is scratched. The photos from the main camera now all look hazy. The terrible quality had resulted in me taking a lot of self-portraits from the second camera.

Since I didn’t want to use Instagram too often, I have uploaded the pictures to Flickr directly. This means that I haven’t posted any pictures to Facebook; I haven’t posted any pictures to Twitter, and none where uploaded to Picasa Web.

Strangely enough it doesn’t bother me.

Maybe it bothers me a bit because I’ve been using simple photos of my daily life as a replacement for status updates for my family and friends. We’ll see. Perhaps I’ll post status updates again. Or I’ll abandon Facebook. Or resume the use of Instagram.

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8324/8361623336_2a0c20b3ac_m.jpg http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8046/8349494004_a65d7c1f1e_n.jpg http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8498/8344704179_37787e214f_m.jpg http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8082/8324968293_acd56ba786_n.jpg

Tags: RSS RSS RSS

Comments on 2013-01-08 Online Photos

Last edit

No diff available.

Add Comment

2012-09-29 External Fonts for SVG Files

I was writing a Perl CGI script that takes a SVG file I created with Inkscape, replaces a few placeholders and serves it via the web. How to supply this SVG file with an external TrueType font?

Upload the fonthttp://campaignwiki.org/Purisa.ttf

Add an appropriate MIME type – in the directory where the font file is, register an appropriate MIME type in your .htaccess file:

AddType application/x-font-ttf        .ttf

If you are creating a new .htaccess file, remember it needs a permission like -rw-r--r--.

Add an external style sheet to the SVG file – it is not obvious how to do this in Inkscape. I guess you can open the XML Editor and add an svg:style element. I just pasted the following into the beginning of my SVG file:

  <style
     type="text/css">
      @font-face {
          font-family: 'Purisa';
          src: local('Purisa'),
               url('/Purisa.ttf') format('truetype');
      }
  </style>

Care about Internet Explorer? I don’t have access to IE at the moment. I read that you might need to add an .eot file to support IE, and that would also require another MIME type to be added. You can convert a .ttf font to an .eot font using ttf2eot on the web.

Tags: RSS RSS

Comments on 2012-09-29 External Fonts for SVG Files

Last edit

No diff available.

Add Comment

2012-03-13 Campaign Wikis

Recently Calithena of Fight On asked on Dragonsfoot: Do any of you have your campaigns on line?

I said:

  • Ymir’s Call – I play every other Monday evening in a Barbarians of Lemuria campaign with DM Florian. Last session we switched to Crypts & Things. German campaign wiki.
  • Hagfish Tavern was the D&D 3.5 adventure path Rise of the Runelords we played before Ymir’s Call.
  • Kurobano And The Dragons was the M20 game that switched to D&D 3.5 before we started Hagfish Tavern.
  • The Alder King – I run a Solar System game set in the Wilderlands of High Fantasy on two Sunday afternoons a month, in German. This campaign used D&D 3.5 and English before we switched to Solar System RPG. Right now it’s on a short hiatus as we give the Great Pendragon Campaign a try for two or three sessions. I’ve heard one player mumble that maybe we should try it for a bit longer, though.
  • Durgan’s Flying Circus – I play in a monthly Harp game with GM Stefan on another Sunday each month.
  • Desert Raiders was the Pathfinder RPG adventure path Legacy of Fire we played before Durgan’s Flying Circus.
  • The Golden Lanterns was the D&D 3.5 adventure path Shackled City we played before Desert Raiders.
  • Fünf Winde– I run a Labyrinth Lord game set in the Wilderlands of High Fantasy on one Tuesday each month. I used to run two separate groups in the same campaign area, but ended up merging the two groups because one of the two kept shrinking. Both in German.
  • Wilderlande – I run a Labyrinth Lord campaign set in a Points of Light campaign setting for my best friend and his three kids for two hours on a Friday evening every month. Also in German.
  • Lied vom Eis is a Song of Ice and Fire RPG campaign I used to play in; mostly in German.
  • Die Reise nach Rhûn was a Rolemaster campaign in Middle Earth that switched to Legends of Middle Earth we played before Lied vom Eis. German.

There’s more… There must be at least two short Burning Wheel campaigns on that site (Burning Six, Campaign:Krythos). And a Mongoose Traveller game that switched to Diaspora (Campaign:Kaylash). And a wiki I used for my DM notes when running the Kurobano campaign (Campaign:Attaxa). And a Forgotten Realms campaign using D&D 3.5 (Sohn des schwarzen Marlin). And another D&D 3.5 sandbox (Campaign:Grenzmarken).

I totally recommend keeping notes online! :D

(I run the Campaign Wiki site which explains why I’m so enthusiastic about it.)

Tags: RSS RSS RSS

Comments on 2012-03-13 Campaign Wikis

Last edit

Summary: http:www.obsidianportal.comcampaignsnumenhalla http:www.obsidianportal.comcampaignsof-stone-and-shadow http:www.obsidianportal.comcampaignsdeathless-gods

No diff available.


-C
http://www.obsidianportal.com/campaigns/numenhalla http://www.obsidianportal.com/campaigns/of-stone-and-shadow http://www.obsidianportal.com/campaigns/deathless-gods

-C 2012-03-14 09:57 UTC

Add Comment

More...

Referrers: alex schröder fünf Winde - Bing

Show Google +1