2019-09-29 I have no hope

I have no hope for the future. It’s all about trying to avoid the worst that is coming as far as I am concerned. Perhaps we will get a lucky break. But as far as we can tell now, our children will not be getting a lucky break.

I liked Sinners in the Hands of an Angry Greta Thunberg In the New Republic.

So many things they get right, with quotes by Thunberg.

And here’s a new word for you:

Thunberg is a case study in what Cornel West has often called, in relation to the radicalism of Martin Luther King Jr., “Santa Clausification”—the softening of a public figure’s profile into something more anodyne and broadly acceptable.

More on Cornel West.

Tags:

Comments

Once again, you echo something I blogged about last Christmas. Apologies for the shameless plug; hopefully it’s not a repeat.

The sad part is not having anything new to add. Even words are running out these days. They didn’t help.

Felix 2019-09-29 12:04 UTC


One thing does spring to mind after reading the article: “you’re either with me or against me”.

Felix 2019-09-29 12:15 UTC


The bad news continues with 'Alarming' extinction threat to Europe's trees by Helen Briggs on the BBC: “of all 454 tree species native to the continent ... The report found: 42% are threatened with extinction (assessed as Vulnerable, Endangered or Critically Endangered)” 😔

– Alex Schroeder 2019-09-29 13:57 UTC


Felix, it seems to me that we all need to keep our own mental health in mind. I recently heard somebody say that the first duty of care is not create another patient. So, take care of outselves. You write:

live, stick together and be good people. Experience, create, enjoy. Make things as good as we can, for as many people as we can, until we can do no more.

Sounds good to me! 🙂

– Alex Schroeder 2019-09-29 17:40 UTC


What the fuck is wrong with people. Who the hell works on this shit? Thousands of ships fitted with ‘cheat devices’ to divert poisonous pollution into sea.

– Alex Schroeder 2019-10-01 21:17 UTC


The Limits of Clean Energy:

In 2017, the World Bank released a little-noticed report that offered the first comprehensive look at this question. It models the increase in material extraction that would be required to build enough solar and wind utilities to produce an annual output of about 7 terawatts of electricity by 2050. That’s enough to power roughly half of the global economy. By doubling the World Bank figures, we can estimate what it will take to get all the way to zero emissions—and the results are staggering: 34 million metric tons of copper, 40 million tons of lead, 50 million tons of zinc, 162 million tons of aluminum, and no less than 4.8 billion tons of iron.

Indeed, no energy is truly free. We need to use less energy, full stop. We could cull the human population, good luck with that, or simply live more frugal, simpler lives. I think that means that in general the world will be poorer in terms of GDP measures and the like, the relative cost of medicine will increase since we want to keep living long and healthy lives, and thus other industries will need to go: the military-industrial complex, car culture, the easy intercontinental holidays, and so on.

– Alex Schroeder 2019-11-23 12:22 UTC


2019 Report on the Production Gap: «Governments are planning to produce about 50% more fossil fuels by 2030 than would be consistent with limiting warming to 2°C and 120% more than would be consistent with limiting warming to 1.5°C.»

I hadn’t seen this website before: «The Production Gap Report addresses the necessary winding down of the world’s production of fossil fuels in order to meet climate goals.»

– Alex Schroeder 2019-11-24 09:13 UTC


Über die Journalisten, die sich übertölpeln lassen, die Leugner der Klimakatastrophe, und wie das zur Folge hat, dass über die Klimakatastrophe nicht richtig berichtet wird, und sich jeder Laie auch noch zu Wort melden darf, um auf Augenhöhe mit Experten zu “diskutieren.” [1]

Wegen dem deutschen Leistungsschutzrecht und der mir daraus entstehenden Rechtsunsicherheit ohne Zitat.

– Alex Schroeder 2019-11-30 08:53 UTC


Climate Change Performance Index, press release:

+++ Climate Change Performance Index 2020: Decreasing emissions in 31 out of 57 high emitting countries - global coal consumption falling +++ But more ambition and accelerated action needed +++ USA for the first time replaces Saudi Arabia as worst performing country +++ Sweden continues to lead, Denmark climbs up significantly in the ranking +++

The Climate Change Performance Index (CCPI) presented today at the climate summit in Madrid reflects opposing trends in global climate action: Australia, Saudi Arabia and especially the USA give cause for great concern with their low to very low performance in emissions and renewable energy development as well as climate policy. With these three governments massively influenced by the coal and oil lobby, there are hardly any signs of serious climate policy in sight. On the other hand, global coal consumption is falling and the boom in renewable energy continues. In 31 of the 57 high emitting countries assessed, collectively responsible for 90 percent of emissions, falling emission trends are recorded.→ more

– Alex Schroeder 2019-12-11 18:45 UTC


@GreenandBlack recently boosted the following from Twitter:

says:

$300 billion. That’s the amount of money needed to stop the rise in greenhouse gases and buy up to 20 years of time to fix global warming, according to UN climate scientists

And also says:

The world’s 500 wealthiest people gained $1.2 trillion this year, boosting their collective net worth 25% to 5.9 trillion

Bloomberg headlines

– Alex Schroeder 2020-01-02 14:18 UTC


Please make sure you contribute only your own work, or work licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. Note: in order to facilitate peer review and fight vandalism, we will store your IP number for a number of days. See Privacy Policy for more information. See Info for text formatting rules. You can edit the comment page if you need to fix typos. You can subscribe to new comments by email without leaving a comment.

To save this page you must answer this question:

Please say HELLO.