BookClub

This page serves as a starting point for our English book club in Zürich, Switzerland.

We have a Meetup page!

To help pick books for future meetings, check our List of Open Books and add your opinions or propose your own. Go there, add books, and vote! It’s what makes our reading fun and diverse …

To edit a book meeting page:

  1. click on the title of the meeting below
  2. click on Edit this page or Diese Seite bearbeiten at the very bottom of the page

There is no login required, just pick any username you like when saving.

2020-06 Book Club

”Pachinko” by Min Jin Lee

When: 24 June, 19:30 – RSVP on Meetup (optional 😉)

Where: Restaurant Werdguet

Pachinko is the second novel by Korean-American author Min Jin Lee. Published in 2017, Pachinko is an epic historical novel following a Korean family who eventually migrates to Japan, it is the first novel written for an adult, English-speaking audience about Japanese–Korean culture. (...) Pachinko takes place between the years of 1910 and 1989, a period that included the Japanese occupation of Korea and World War II. As an historical novel, these events play a central role (...) influencing the characters’ decisions. (...) The character-driven tale features a large ensemble of characters who become subjected to issues of racism and stereotypes, among other events with historical origins in the 20th-century Korean experiences with Japan.”

Page count: 450

Pitch text from: Wikipedia

Pitch by: Bozena

First Suggested: August 2019

Supporter(s): Bozena, Nicole M., Nela, Nadya, Uli, Mo, Katie, Martin, Janine

Add Comment

2020-05 Book Club

”Freedom or Death” by Nikos Kazantzakis (Original greek title: Captain Michaelis)

When: 27 May, 19:30 – RSVP on Meetup (optional 😉)

Where: Restaurant Werdguet – wouldn’t that be nice? But perhaps not yet …

Freedom or Death by Nikos Kazantzakis is a novel on the heroic or epic scale about the rebellion of the Greek Christians against the Turks on the island of Crete, where Kazantzakis was from. The story follows the exploits of a Greek: Captain Michalis and his blood brother, Nurey Bey, a Turk, through war, love , friendship, hatred and a backdrop of the island of Crete with all its beauty, drama, joy and sadness. This book was unanimously praised by critics worldwide as the work of a master with characters that come to life and destined to live forever.

Pitch text: goodreads.com

Pitched by: Alexander

First suggested: March 2019

Supporter(s): Alexander, Martin, Bozena, Nela, Janine

Add Comment

2020-04 Book Club

”Madame” by Antoni Libera

When: 22 April, 19:30 – RSVP on Meetup to get Zoom call details 😉

Where: Online meeting via Zoom, details see Meetup

Madame is an unexpected gem: a novel about Poland during the grim years of Soviet-controlled mediocrity, which nonetheless sparkles with light and warmth. (...) Our young narrator-hero is suffering through the regulated boredom of high school when he is transfixed by a new teacher - an elegant “older woman” (she is thirty-two) who bewitches him with her glacial beauty and her strict intelligence. He resolves to learn everything he can about her and to win her heart. In a sequence of marvelously funny but sobering maneuvers, he learns much more than he expected to – about politics, Poland, the Spanish Civil War, and his own passion for theater and art – all while his loved one continues to elude him.”

Pitch text from: goodreads.com

Pitch by: Bozena

First Suggested: August 2019

Supporter(s): Bozena, Nela, Uli, Nico, Katie, Martin, Janine

Add Comment

2020-03 Book Club

”Pachinko” by Min Jin Lee

No meetup in March; moved to 24 June

Pachinko is the second novel by Korean-American author Min Jin Lee. Published in 2017, Pachinko is an epic historical novel following a Korean family who eventually migrates to Japan, it is the first novel written for an adult, English-speaking audience about Japanese–Korean culture. (...) Pachinko takes place between the years of 1910 and 1989, a period that included the Japanese occupation of Korea and World War II. As an historical novel, these events play a central role (...) influencing the characters’ decisions. (...) The character-driven tale features a large ensemble of characters who become subjected to issues of racism and stereotypes, among other events with historical origins in the 20th-century Korean experiences with Japan.”

Page count: 450

Pitch text from: Wikipedia

Pitch by: Bozena

First Suggested: August 2019

Supporter(s): Bozena, Nicole M., Nela, Nadya, Uli, Mo, Katie, Martin, Janine

Add Comment

2020-02 Book Club

”The Why Cafe” by John P. Strelecky

When: 19 February, 19:30 – RSVP on Meetup (optional 😉)

Where: Restaurant Werdguet

The inspirational #1 Bestseller by John P. Strelecky. Now translated into twenty-one languages and read by more than a million readers worldwide. In a small cafe at a location so remote it sits in the middle of the middle of nowhere, John--a man in a hurry--is at a crossroads. Intent only on refueling before moving along on his road trip, he finds sustenance of an entirely different kind. In addition to the specials of the day, the cafe menu lists three questions all diners are encourage to consider. Why are you here?

Do you fear death? Are you fulfilled.

With this food for thought and the guidance of three people he meets at the cafe, John embarks on a journey of self-discovery that takes him from the executive suites of the advertising world to the surf of Hawaii’s coastline. Along the way he discovers a new way to look at life, himself, and just how much you can learn from a green sea turtle.

Page count: 144

Pitch text from: Goodreads.com

Pitch by: Rene

First Suggested: November 2019

Supporter(s): Rene, Wendy, Martin, Nicole M.

Add Comment

2020-01 Book Club

”Jerusalem” by Alan Moore

When: 22 January, 19:30 – RSVP on Meetup (optional 😉)

Where: Restaurant Werdguet

Begging comparisons to Tolstoy and Joyce, this “magnificent, sprawling cosmic epic” (Guardian) by Alan Moore—the genre-defying, “groundbreaking, hairy genius of our generation” (NPR)—takes its place among the most notable works of contemporary English literature. In decaying Northampton, eternity loiters between housing projects. Among saints, kings, prostitutes, and derelicts, a timeline unravels: second-century fiends wait in urine-scented stairwells, delinquent specters undermine a century with tunnels, and in upstairs parlors, laborers with golden blood reduce fate to a snooker tournament. Through the labyrinthine streets and pages of Jerusalem tread ghosts singing hymns of wealth and poverty. They celebrate the English language, challenge mortality post-Einstein, and insist upon their slum as Blake’s eternal holy city in “Moore’s apotheosis, a fourth-dimensional symphony” (Entertainment Weekly). This “brilliant . . . monumentally ambitious” tale from the gutter is “a massive literary achievement for our time—and maybe for all times simultaneously” (Washington Post).

Source: www.goodreads.com

Source: http://www.goodreads.com

Chosen ad hoc at June meeting

Add Comment

2019-12 Book Club

”A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens

When: 11 December, 19:30 – RSVP on Meetup (optional 😉)

Where: Restaurant Werdguet

Hi Everyone,

Please remember, December is our book gift exchange month. Wrap up a book you have on your shelf and bring it in as a gift. You will get one in return 🙂

Ebenezer Scrooge, a miserly, cold-hearted creditor, continues his stingy, greedy ways on Christmas Eve. He rejects a Christmas dinner invitation, and all the good tidings of the holiday, from his jolly nephew, Fred; he yells at charity workers; and he overworks his employee, Bob Cratchit. At night, Scrooge’s former partner Jacob Marley, dead for seven years, visits him in the form of a ghost. Marley’s spirit has been wandering since he died as punishment for being consumed with business and not with people while alive. He has come to warn Scrooge and perhaps save him from the same fate. He tells him Three Spirits will come to him over the next three nights.

Scrooge falls asleep and wakes up to find the Ghost of Christmas Past, a small, elderly figure. The Ghost shows Scrooge scenes from the past that trace Scrooge’s development from a young boy, lonely but with the potential for happiness, to a young man with the first traces of greed that would deny love in his life. Scrooge shows newfound emotion when revisiting these scenes, often crying from identification with his former neglected self.

Scrooge goes to sleep and is awakened by the Ghost of Christmas Present, a giant with a life span of one day. He shows Scrooge several current scenes of Christmas joy and charity, then shows him the Cratchit household. The Ghost informs Scrooge that unless the future is changed, the Cratchit’s crippled and good-hearted young son, Tiny Tim, will die. He also shows Scrooge the party at Fred’s house. Finally, a ragged boy and girl crawl out from the Ghost’s robes. The Ghost calls them Ignorance and Want and warns Scrooge to beware of Ignorance.

Decided ad hoc at September meeting – seemed a fitting choice!

Add Comment

2019-11 Book Club

”Haweswater” by Sarah Hall

When: 20 November, 19:30 – RSVP on Meetup (optional 😉)

Where: Restaurant Werdguet

The prizewinning debut from Britain’s most exciting contemporary novelist. In a remote dale in a northern English county, a centuries-old rural community has survived into the mid-1930s almost unchanged. But then Jack Liggett drives in from the city, the spokesman for a Manchester waterworks company with designs on the landscape for a vast new reservoir. The dale must be evacuated, flooded, devastated; its water pumped to the Midlands and its community left in ruins. Liggett further compounds the village’s problems when he begins a troubled affair with Janet Lightburn, a local woman of force and character who is driven to desperate measures in an attempt to save the valley. Told in luminous prose, with an intuitive sense for period and place, Haweswater remembers a rural England that has been lost for many decades.

Review by The Guardian – “Go forth and buy; prepare to weep!!”

Pitched by: Wendy

First suggested: February 2019

Note: “Jerusalem” is not gone! Only postponed to January 2020 so you all have more time to read it 🙂 See 2020-01 Book Club

Add Comment

2019-10 Book Club

”House of Leaves” by Mark Z. Danielewski

When: 23 October, 19:30 – RSVP on Meetup (optional 😉)

Where: Restaurant Werdguet

Years ago, when House of Leaves was first being passed around, it was nothing more than a badly bundled heap of paper, parts of which would occasionally surface on the Internet. No one could have anticipated the small but devoted following this terrifying story would soon command. Starting with an odd assortment of marginalized youth—musicians, tattoo artists, programmers, strippers, environmentalists, and adrenaline junkies—the book eventually made its way into the hands of older generations, who not only found themselves in those strangely arranged pages but also discovered a way back into the lives of their estranged children.

Now, for the first time, this astonishing novel is made available in book form, complete with the original colored words, vertical footnotes, and newly added second and third appendices.

The story remains unchanged, focusing on a young family that moves into a small home on Ash Tree Lane where they discover something is terribly wrong: their house is bigger on the inside than it is on the outside.

Of course, neither Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Will Navidson nor his companion Karen Green was prepared to face the consequences of that impossibility, until the day their two little children wandered off and their voices eerily began to return another story—of creature darkness, of an ever-growing abyss behind a closet door, and of that unholy growl which soon enough would tear through their walls and consume all their dreams.

Source: http://www.goodreads.com

Chosen ad hoc at June meeting

Add Comment

2019-09 Book Club

What: ”City of Glass” by Paul Auster

When: 25 September, 19:30 – RSVP on Meetup (optional 😉)

Where: Restaurant Werdguet

Nominated for an Edgar award for best mystery of the year, City of Glass inaugurates an intriguing New York Trilogy of novels that The Washington Post Book World has classified as “post-existentialist private eye... It’s as if Kafka has gotten hooked on the gumshoe game and penned his own ever-spiraling version.” As a result of a strange phone call in the middle of the night, Quinn, a writer of detective stories, becomes enmeshed in a case more puzzling than any he might have written. Written with hallucinatory clarity, City of Glass combines dark humor with Hitchcock-like suspense. Ghosts and The Locked Room are the next two brilliant installments in Paul Auster’s The New York Trilogy.

Source: http://www.goodreads.com

Chosen ad hoc at June meeting

Add Comment

More...

Comments


Please make sure you contribute only your own work, or work licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. Note: in order to facilitate peer review and fight vandalism, we will store your IP number for a number of days. See Privacy Policy for more information. See Info for text formatting rules. You can edit the comment page if you need to fix typos. You can subscribe to new comments by email without leaving a comment.

To save this page you must answer this question:

Please say HELLO.