Hex Describe

Hex Describe is a little web application I wrote to combine Text Mapper with a random text generator like the fantastic Abulafia. Abulafia is a collection of user-contributed random generators housed within a special kind of wiki.

Image 1 for 2018-03-18 Adding Mushrooms

2018-12-28 Treasure Type

I’ve been adding more treasure to Hex Describe and once again I’m thinking about adding treasure types. Remember those cryptic treasure types in the D&D monster manuals? A lot has been written about them and what they might mean. Perhaps it’s time to start my own categorisation of treasure. I’ve been thinking about adding the following chapter to Halberds and Helmets. It lists the various treasure types, provides a very short summary of what it stands for and what it might likely contain, and most importantly, it lists which entries in my monster chapter are part of it.

What I’m still lacking:

  1. the exact compositions of these hoards (stuff like “Older chimeras often have amassed quite some wealth, for they they do not only prey on those who wish to enter but also on those who wish to leave the netherworld. 50% for 1d8×1000 sp, 50% for 1d8×1000 gp, 20% for 1d6×100 pp, 30% for 3d6 gems, 20% for 1d6 jewelry, 20% for a magic item.)
  2. example hoards (but these should be easy to add, now)
  3. average values of these hoards

What I’m noticing is that I’m assigning treasure types without considering the danger these creatures post. I’m hoping that the special abilities they have, or their numbers, make all of this “reasonable” and that none of these turn out to be “easy picking.”

Treasure

Remember, “Treasure is Experience.” When a big chunk of XP is provided via treasure, fighting turns into a strategic decision: when is it worth to risk a fight? And it makes alternative approaches more rewarding: tricking a dragon makes more sense than fighting it.

Providing enough treasure is important for the party to gain levels. How quickly should the party gain levels? It’s hard to provide good numbers. If your players are frustrated, you might need to add more treasure. I like to run a campaign for fifty sessions or more. Assuming the campaign ends with characters on level ten, that means it took them about five sessions per level. Instead of handing out more treasure than provided for in these tables, consider providing more treasure in a different form:

  1. stealing a ship that is worth 50,000gp would provide as much XP when it is lost (given away, sunk, stolen)
  2. conquering a well maintained keep worth 75,000gp would provide as much XP when it is lost (given away, lost in a siege)

This sort of treasure isn’t listed in the treasure tables below!

If treasure isn’t parceled out in small chunks and isn’t gained in regular intervals, but found rarely and in big chunks, then it works a bit like a slot machine: the reward is rare and hard to predict and thus players might feel a strong urge to be there for every session, and such large hoards become part of the oral tradition of the campaign as players keep talking about it.

(When such design patterns are abused, they are addictive. Signs of addiction are the inability to stop even though you want to, abandoning friends and family, the inability to maintain normal social ties. All of this isn’t true when you’re simply playing in a regular role-playing group so I wouldn’t worry about it.)

This is why treasure is defined in terms of probabilities: you roll for it. Players might get a lot of treasure, but they might also get nothing at all. Beating a dragon is not a guarantee of a rich reward. Players need to determine whether the particular dragon they are targeting does in fact have a big hoard. If it doesn’t, I hope the players are at least doing it for the right reasons and not for material gain and personal advancement. This encourages players to look gather information and to scout, both of which make the game more interesting and the decision to risk a fight a strategic one.

The following monsters have unique treasures:

Dragons: They actively seek out treasure, destroying settlements of others and looting them. And their servants bring them gifts. They have everything.

Dwarves: They actively seek out treasure, digging deep and plundering as they go. They also have everything.

Golem: Within their bodies, gems can be found.

Pixies: They have but a tiny pot of gold.

Unicorn: It’s horn and it’s hair is valuable.

All the other monsters are assigned a treasure type.

Treasure Types

None: Some creatures don’t have a fixed lair and don’t collect shiny baubles (bear, giant bee, giant beetle, boar, giant cat, giant centipede, giant crab, crocodile, elephant, giant fish, giant goat, hell hound, horse, ifrit, jinni, invisible stalker, jinni, giant lizard, marid, pegasus, giant scorpion, sea serpent, shark, skeleton, giant snake, giant squid, giant toad, giant weasel, wolf, giant worm, zombie). They have no treasure.

Poor: Intelligent creatures that live in ruins, finding the things others have left behind (giant apes, doppelgänger, frogling, gargoyle, goblin, gnoll, kappa, lycanthrope, myconid, nixie, giant spider, treant). These have very little treasure.

Baubles: Creatures that collect only gems (gnome, swamp crane).

Humanoids: Creatures that live in settlements (halfling, human, lizard people). These have a lot of silver and gold coins and a lot of magic items, but few platinum coins, gems and jewelry.

Rich: Creatures that get presents from others (centaurs, giants, rakshasa, vampire). They have a lot of coin but also gems, jewelry and magic items.

Ancients: Creatures that live underground, plundering the riches of ancient empires, or remnants of ancient empires (elf, spectre). These have magic items and platinum coins.

Robbers: Creatures that rob merchants and travellers (ettin, hobgoblin, manticore, minotaur, ogre, orc, troll). They tend to have a lot of silver and gold coins, and some gems, but few magic items and no platinum coins.

Scouts: Creatures travelling in small groups, perhaps in the service of others (bugbear, tengu). These may have some magic items and some platinum coins, but very little else.

Terrors: Creatures with magical powers cursing the land (basilisk, chimera, gorgon, harpy, hydra, medusa, naga, salamander, shadow). These treasures have a lot of magic items because of all the failed heroes that tried to kill them.

The Dead: The graves yield what people bury with their dead, mostly coins and jewelry (creeper, ghouls, mummy, wight, wraith).

Continued: 2019-01-01 Treasure Type Again.

Tags:

Comments on 2018-12-28 Treasure Type

I tried to add this chapter to the book, and move the treasure specification from the dragon treasure there. But as a user of the book, that seems to lead to more leafing around. Better to keep things as they are. I can still use treasure types in the background, and I can still use this text. But I don’t want to tell the referee who just read up on elves that they can roll up their treasure by turning to “Treasure of the Ancients” table.

– Alex Schroeder 2018-12-29 21:39 UTC


And I half remembered seeing an analysis of the AD&D treasure types before and now I found it again: Rob Conley had it on his blog in 2012. Part 1 and Part 2.

– Alex Schroeder 2018-12-30 10:00 UTC

Add Comment

2018-12-23 Entries with treasure and stats

I wonder whether adding stats and treasure isn’t going to dilute the text generated. On the one hand, I love it. I can run the adventure straight from the text! But on the other hand... It’s hard to find stuff! Then again, perhaps that’s what the map is for. And using bold for monsters does make it sort of easy to pick out what’s going on.

On one of these hills stands a ruined fortress currently occupied by 2 warlocks (HD 4 → 5d4 AC 4/2 1d6 M5 MV 12 ML 9 XP 500; spells: magic missile (3×1d6+1), shield (reduces AC 9 to AC 4 in melee and AC 2 in ranged combat), phantasmal force (one or two of them use these illusions to split the party), mirror image (1d4 images to protect the caster), lightning bolt (5d6 damage, save vs. spells for half), each spell 1×/day) and their giant scorpion mounts (HD 4 AC 2 1d10/1d10/1d4 + poison F2 MV 15 ML 11 XP 400). 4 gems. A prayer of protection of the moon (8h, prevents were-creatures from approaching). A potion of healing (1d6+1, foamy purple). The fortress and its surrounding land is ruled by the medusa Snake Mistress (HD 4 AC 8 1d6 or poison F6 MV 9 ML 8 XP 400; petrification). The courtyard and rooms are full of her petrified victims and the bones of the dead. 3000 gold coins. A potion of fire resistance (1h, red, black residue, smelling like vomit).

I wonder whether I should add automatic highlighting: yellow background for treasure?

Another thing I’m considering: I could add images I drew for the monster manual?

Tags:

Comments on 2018-12-23 Entries with treasure and stats

That text block is hard to parse out, some kind of formatting would definitely make it easier to use.

Derik Badman 2018-12-23 15:29 UTC


So you think the quantity is fine, it just needs some more formatting, i.e. paragraph breaks and the like? I guess I could also use underline or arrows...

– Alex Schroeder 2018-12-23 16:56 UTC

Add Comment

2018-12-22 More random tables

Writing tables for Hex Describe. Added treasure for hobgoblins and orcs. Now I need a bunch of magic items but I don’t want to copy stuff from a book. So it’ll be all: how much can I remember? How much can I invent? And will it be any good‽

Right now I’m not providing the value of gems and jewelry. Perhaps I should?

I like the summoning scrolls.

There are currently no tables for magic weapons, magic armour and wondrous items. Still need to do these.

The table driven construction makes it hard to create comma separated lists at the moment. That’s why treasure is simply “a thing. a thing. a thing.” instead of “a thing, a thing, and a thing.”

Hobgoblin Treasure

  • 400 platinum coins.
  • 6 gems.
  • 4000 silver coins.
  • 1000 silver coins. 4 jewelry.
  • 500 platinum coins.

Orc Treasure

  • 6 gems.
  • 5 jewelry. A potion of flying (1h, orange, black residue).
  • 1 jewelry. A potion of strength (20min, strength 18, blue).
  • A prayer of protection of the moon (8h, prevents were-creatures from approaching).
  • 8000 gold coins. A scroll of crashing gates (destroy one door up to 20m wide).
  • 6000 gold coins. 4 gems. 6 jewelry. A prayer of summoning (the vulture demon Pestilence, from Sandstein, Pazuzu’s tower in Vanaheim: HD 8+1 AC 5 1d4/1d4/1d6/1d6/1d8 MV 18 ML 11; flying; only harmed by magic or magic weapons).
  • 6000 gold coins.

Potions

  • potion of flying (1h, sparkling red)
  • potion of fire belching (20min, 3d6, save vs. dragon breath for half, rose, silvery flakes)
  • potion of invisibility (20min, no attacks, dark green)
  • potion of cold resistance (1h, foamy green)
  • potion of fire belching (20min, 3d6, save vs. dragon breath for half, dark orange)
  • potion of healing (1d6+1, sparkling rose, smelling like vomit)
  • potion of strength (20min, strength 18, green, silvery flakes, smelling like passion fruit)

Scrolls

  • scroll of fire ball (6d6, save vs. spells for half)
  • scroll of fire ball (6d6, save vs. spells for half)
  • scroll of bashing walls (punch a hole 20m wide and deep into anything made of wood, earth or stone)
  • prayer of protection of the moon (8h, prevents were-creatures from approaching)
  • prayer of summoning (the hunter general Strength, from Unugal, Marduk’s hall in Midgard: HD 6+1 AC 7 1d6 F6 MV 12; leading a hundertschaft, one hundred light infantery: HD 1 AC 7 1d6 MV 12 ML 10)
  • scroll of crashing gates (destroy one door up to 20m wide)
  • prayer of summoning (the minotaur Spririt Guide, from Eldivatn, Mitra’s hall in Muspelheim: HD 6 AC 6 2d6 MV 12; mesmerize any listeners at will, i.e. listeners must save vs. spells or cease all hostilities and speak nothing but the truth; immune to sleep and charm)

Tags:

Add Comment

2018-12-21 Random tables

I wanted to work a bit on Hex Describe, and my tables just kept growing... And I wanted to write about it.

How it begins

I was looking at some Hex Describe output and noticed this:

“1102: Steep cliffs make progress practically impossible without climbing gear. At the foot of a small hill, Blue Rindle makes its appearance.”

Boring?

Let’s see where this comes from. Ah, the “mountains” table:

;mountain
1,The green valley up here has some sheep and a *kid* called [human kid] guarding them.
1,There is a cold pond up in this valley [cold lake].
1,The upper valley is rocky and bare. [hill giants]
1,Steep cliffs make progress practically impossible without climbing gear.
1,Nothing but gray rocks up here in the mountains.
1,High up on on a ridge is an old elven tower made of green glass, [green tower].
1,On one of the rock faces you can still see the markings of the old dwarf forge [dwarf forge]. [forge ruin]

I decided to add some sort of “secret”:

1,Steep cliffs make progress practically impossible without climbing gear. [mountain secret]

I started writing: “Way up, where the air is thin and cold, ...” and then I decided: no, I can put that into a table!

;mountain secret
1,[way up], [a secret mountain thing]

;way up
1,[up here], [where it is high up]

;up here
1,Way up
1,Up here
1,Above these cliffs
1,In the middle of a sheer cliff
1,Amidst the stars
1,Where they mountains touch the sky
1,Where the clouds don't reach

;where it is high up
1,where the air is thin and cold
1,where the ice king rules
1,only reachable by flight
1,where no bird dares to fly
1,where the barrier between the worlds is fickle

;a secret mountain thing
1,there is an inscription on the rocks, each letter higher than three men standing on top of each other, proclaiming the power and glory of [wight leader], as well as the riches and treasures of [ancient capital] [capital epithet].

The rule [way up] generates things like the following:

  • Amidst the stars, where no bird dares to fly
  • Where they mountains touch the sky, where the ice king rules
  • Where they mountains touch the sky, where the barrier between the worlds is fickle
  • Way up, where no bird dares to fly
  • Above these cliffs, where no bird dares to fly
  • Where they mountains touch the sky, where the air is thin and cold

Sure, a bit more variety would be great. But it do for now.

Names

I already had rules to generate wight rulers. But what about the name of capitals? I started a list.

;ancient capital
1,Agua
1,Bilach
1,Cheim
1,Iridiz
1,Jamala
1,Xarran
1,Ytilan
1,Zambosa

Then I figured, well, I could actually just assemble these names from syllables. So how about this:

;ancient capital
2,[ancient capital beginning][ancient capital end]
1,[ancient capital beginning][ancient capital middle][ancient capital end]

;ancient capital beginning
1,A
1,Bi
1,Chei
1,I
1,Ja
1,U
1,Va
1,Xa
1,Y
1,Zam

;ancient capital middle
1,bo
1,fa
1,fi
1,la
1,ma
1,na
1,ri
1,ti

;ancient capital end
1,gua
1,lach
1,nn
1,m
1,diz
1,la
1,lan
1,rran
1,sa

And now the generator produces names like the following for [ancient capital]:

  • Alach
  • Vann
  • Xalach
  • Binn
  • Amadiz
  • Xafinn
  • Jann
  • Jafirran
  • Zamdiz
  • Xala

Epithet

OK, so I need an epithet for an ancient capital. How about the following:

;capital epithet
1,the [capital adjective]
1,the twice [capital adjective]
1,of the [capital verb] [capital object]

;capital adjective
1,Glorious
1,Beautiful
1,Righteous
1,Powerful
1,Strong

;capital verb
1,Hanging
1,Shining
1,Towering

;capital object
1,Gardens
1,Fortress
1,Walls
1,Treasures
1,Trees

And if I combine the two, [ancient capital] [capital epithet] now results in the following:

  • Jadiz of the Hanging Walls
  • Zamdiz of the Towering Gardens
  • Zamm of the Shining Trees
  • Birran the Powerful
  • Cheim the Beautiful
  • Xala the twice Glorious
  • Ugua the twice Glorious
  • Zamrilach of the Hanging Fortress
  • Bilach of the Towering Trees

End result

And now the result for [mountain secret]:

  • Way up, only reachable by flight, there is an inscription on the rocks, each letter higher than three men standing on top of each other, proclaiming the power and glory of Queen Thyia of Quddu, as well as the riches and treasures of Ifalach the Powerful.
  • Way up, where no bird dares to fly, there is an inscription on the rocks, each letter higher than three men standing on top of each other, proclaiming the power and glory of Kali the Terrible of Merlen, as well as the riches and treasures of Ygua the twice Strong.
  • Amidst the stars, only reachable by flight, there is an inscription on the rocks, each letter higher than three men standing on top of each other, proclaiming the power and glory of King Eilif of Merlen, as well as the riches and treasures of Zamnasa of the Shining Fortress.
  • Where they mountains touch the sky, where the air is thin and cold, there is an inscription on the rocks, each letter higher than three men standing on top of each other, proclaiming the power and glory of King Kyran of Abilard, as well as the riches and treasures of Ifilach of the Shining Treasures.
  • Amidst the stars, where the air is thin and cold, there is an inscription on the rocks, each letter higher than three men standing on top of each other, proclaiming the power and glory of Eilif the Terrible of Pichuhiatl, as well as the riches and treasures of Ula of the Towering Treasures.

It’s a start! I need more secrets.

Tags:

Comments on 2018-12-21 Random tables

And a bit later:

  • Where the mountains touch the sky, where the air is thin and cold, a pair of gryphons is nesting. Agents of the Confederacy of the Voids would pay 5000gp for their egg, they say.
  • In the middle of a sheer cliff, where the air is thin and cold, a pair of gryphons is nesting. Agents of the Enchanted Order of Preparers would pay 5000gp for their egg, they say.
  • Amidst the stars, where no bird dares to fly, there is an inscription on the rocks, each letter higher than three men standing on top of each other, proclaiming the power and glory of Kali the Terrible of Yzarria, as well as the riches and treasures of Vamam the twice Glorious.
  • In the middle of a sheer cliff, where the barrier between the worlds is fickle, there is an inscription on the rocks, each letter higher than three men standing on top of each other, proclaiming the power and glory of King Eilif of Trazadan, as well as the riches and treasures of Udiz of the Shining Fortress.
  • Way up, where the ice king rules, a cave leads into the lair of Bálint the Frozen, a banished ice devil, and his 2d6 four armed, white gorillas living in a large ice cave with a mount of bones as big as a house upon which the devil has built his throne of ice and steel.

– Alex Schroeder 2018-12-21 18:56 UTC

Add Comment

2018-04-10 Updates

Not much to say. I’m enjoying my time in Japan. Sometimes, when we’re back at the hotel, I sit in my room and work on Hex Describe. Check out the activity on GitHub, if you’re interested.

If you want, reload the village description a few times. There’s more information for keeps, towers, and temples of Set, Orcus, and Thor. I still need to add more descriptions for the remaining major powers.

Tags:

Add Comment

2018-03-21 Adding Factions

I’ve added the naming of regional things to Hex Describe. Once again, it was a conversation with Paolo Greco that pushed me. Thanks!

Basically, the idea is that there are some regional things with names such as factions, dukes, and so on. In the following example, we have bugbears belonging to the Wolf Eyes tribe and I want to make sure that there are at most three tribes on the map, but I don’t want to use the same three names for every map. Thus, I need a table to generate bugbear band names, and there should be at most three of them.

0302: Hiding between the trees are watchful eyes in the service of the elves underground, 6 bugbears led by one they call Silent Paws belonging to the Wolf Eyes band. There is a town of 100 humans led by a necromancer (level 9) called Florina who lives in a keep with a retainer, the fighter (level 7) Shathviha and their whip, the knight Henna (level 6). The log cabins are protected by a town wall and the river. There is a market. Green Creek runs through here. Shady Road leads through here.

Image 1 for 2018-03-18 Adding Mushrooms

Here’s how to set it up:

;trees
...
1,Hiding between the trees are watchful eyes in the service of the elves underground, [1d8 bugbears].


;fir-forest
...
1,In this fir forest is a little campsite with [1d8 bugbears].

;1d8 bugbears
1,the *bugbear* [bugbear]
7,[1d7+1] *bugbears* led by one they call [bugbear] belonging to [a bugbear band]

;a bugbear band
1,[name for a bugbear band1]
1,[name for a bugbear band2]
1,[name for a bugbear band3]

;name for a bugbear band1
1,[bugbear band]

;name for a bugbear band2
1,[bugbear band]

;name for a bugbear band3
1,[bugbear band]

;bugbear band
1,[bugbear band 1] [bugbear band 2]

;bugbear band 1
1,Bear
1,Lynx
1,Cat
1,Wolf

;bugbear band 2
1,Claws
1,Ears
1,Teeth
1,Eyes

The pattern “name for a thing” is key, here. Whenever a table has this name, it will determine the result for the table and keep returning that. Thus, with the tables as they are, eventually all the bugbear bands will have one of three names as “name for a bugbear band1-3” are eventually determined.

Tags:

Add Comment

2018-03-20 Naming Rivers, Canyons, Trails

I’ve added the naming of linear things to Hex Describe. Rivers, trails, canyons, and any user-defined lines on the map can now have names. The default map implements this in a very simplistic manner, mostly just to show that it works.

0201: A ruined tower standing on a small island in this swamp is home to the ettin called Club and Nail. Brown Creek runs through here. Hollow Lane goes through here.

Image 1 for 2018-03-18 Adding Mushrooms

The basis of all this are the generated lines on the map. The Alpine maps usually come with things like the following at the end:

...
1704-1604-1505 canyon
1510-1610-1711 river
1609-1710-1810-1711 river
1310-1410-1511 river
...
0404-0302 trail
0709-0610 trail
0305-0302 trail
...

These can now be named. The default table has entries like the following:

;canyon
1,[name for river] has dug itself a deep gorge.
1,The gorge is wonderful and deep.
1,Crossing the canyon requires climbing gear.

;river
1,[name for river] flows through here.
1,[name for river] runs through here.

;name for river
1,[river 1] [river 2]

...

;trail
1,[name for trail] goes through here.
1,[name for trail] leads through here.

;name for trail
9,[trail 1] [trail 2]
1,[trail 1] [trail 1] [trail 2]

I like it, but perhaps it’s getting too verbose? This information should probably simple be on the map itself. But that’s harder to do...

Tags:

Comments on 2018-03-20 Naming Rivers, Canyons, Trails

From my G+ post:

I think this means that almost all of the code aspects I wanted to implement are now implemented. What’s missing is the naming of singular things, like “There are barracks with troops loyal to [name for a duke 1].” Whenever it would get used, the same name would get produced for the entire region. There would be no dependency on map features.

The big challenge that lies ahead is to improve the tables in order to maintain my vision of the “basic” and “boring” wilderness setup, with a better distribution of encounters, more and better names, more interesting settlements and lairs without going crazy. Should I add treasure?

Without going crazy is important to me. After all, this is supposed to create a mini-campaign setting for the referee to work on. Perhaps the most important change would be the addition of more whitespace between the hex descriptions! “Basic & Boring” is my motto. I would like to make it easy for people to take the default tables and add their own (taking tables from Abulafia, for example), and then republishing those.

– Alex Schroeder 2018-03-20 10:52 UTC


I always say: know your competition. Today I learned of an alternative to Abulafia and Hex Describe called Tracery. It’s a text generator written in Javascript.

An interesting feature it has: “Often you want to save information. [...] In their basic form, they create some new rules and push them onto a symbol, creating that symbol if it didn’t exist, or hiding its previous value if it did.”

And more, haha:

Oh, an Allison is on Mastodon, too: @aparrish.

– Alex Schroeder 2018-03-20 18:44 UTC


Christoper Week suggested a look at RandomGen, yet another random text driven generator. And it has context variables, too. The How To has so many good ideas!

  • automatic s for plurals
  • automatic an or a for the article
  • capitalization (first letter or all words)
  • identifiers (variables)
  • attributes (associated with identifiers)
  • variable repetitions
  • quick alternatives without subtables
  • including remote text files
  • using Pastebins

There is nothing new under the sun and all my generator does is retrace a path taken by plenty of others. Well, I connect it to a map, I guess that’s new. Maybe that tells me where I need to focus.

– Alex 2018-03-20 19:34 UTC

Add Comment

2018-03-19 Adding Faces

I’ve plugged my Face Generator into Hex Describe. Here is the output of a settlement governed by a bunch of humans, with faces.

Showing faces

The setup depends on the implementation details, sadly.

The default table has the following entry:

;human
1,[man]<img src="[[redirect https://campaignwiki.org/face/redirect/alex/man]]" />
1,[woman]<img src="[[redirect https://campaignwiki.org/face/redirect/alex/woman]]" />

As HTML gets passed through, this already adds the images to the output. Getting them to float in an acceptable manner took a bit more work. There is a post-processing step which rearranges the HTML: It moves all the images in a paragraph to the very beginning and into a span element with a class I can refer to in the CSS. With that, I can then size the faces using CSS, and float the images to the left.

What do you think?

The construct [[redirect URL]] should work for any web service that redirects to its result. Instead of following the redirect and retrieving the image, the construct just inserts the new location into the output. This makes sure that you can save the description to a file, reload it in the future, and you’ll still get the same faces.

In practice I think this will be hard for services not hosted on the same domain since campaignwiki.org is secured by HTTPS and I think most browsers will then refuse to load resources such as images from services that aren’t hosted on the same domain (same-origin policy).

I guess Hex Describe could proxy the resources. But perhaps that opens me up to abuse? I don’t know. We’ll see when somebody asks me to support something specific.

The human names are taken from my Halberds & Helmets Character Generator, by the way. Those were taken from the Zurich birth registers in 2012. Sadly, the original data is no longer available.

Tags:

Add Comment

2018-03-18 Adding Mushrooms

These days I try to write a table or two for Hex Describe every day.

Today I hopped on the RPG OSR Discord channel and asked: “Anybody interested in spending half an hour adding content to some random tables used to describe a mountainous region?” Tommi Brander spoke up and we expanded on the mushrooms together.

Image 1

This is what we came up with:

;forest
1,Tall trees and dense canopy keep the sunlight away. There are big mushrooms everywhere. [mushrooms]
...

;mushrooms
1,The mushrooms are guarded by [mykonids]
1,If eaten, [do something interesting]
1,These mushrooms are actually the antennaes and horns for the big sleeping supermushroom [name for forest/forest-hill/trees/fir-forest/firs] living beneath the forest. Around here, your sleep will be filled with mushroom dreams.

;mykonids
1,[3d6] *mykonids*.
1,[3d6] *mykonids* guarding a mushroom circle. On nights of the full moon, or on a 1 in 6, the portal to the fey realms opens. If so, [2d12] *elves* led by one they call [elf leader] (level [1d6+1]) will be visiting.

;do something interesting
1,save vs. poison or die. The locals use this to kill criminals.
1,save vs. poison or loose your voice for a week. The locals avoid doing this.
1,save vs. poison or be cursed to turn into a mykonid over the coming week.
1,save vs. poison or be paralysed for 1d4 hours. Local Set cultists will trade in these mushrooms.
1,gain telepathic powers for a week. The locals use them to spy on the thoughts of any foreigners.
1,enjoy wild and colorful visions for 1d20 hours. If you roll higher than your wisdom, see something relevant for the current campaign. The locals lead village idiots here to warn them of impeding danger.
1,heal 1d6+1. The locals assemble here after a fight to recuperate.

Tags:

Add Comment

2018-03-17 Random Goblins

Same procedure as yesterday but now I want to add goblins to my swamps.

A map

This is what my Halberds & Helmets Referee Guide has to say:

Numbers: 6d10, sometimes in the company of 2d6 giant animals. Roll 1d6: 1 = no giant animals, 2–3 = giant wolves, 4 = giant weasels, 5 = giant spiders, 6 = giant beetles.
Names: Death Rider, Man Killer, Eye Poker, Wolf King, Beetle Basher, The Impaler.

These are the tables I added:

;swamp
1,One of the islands of this swamp there is a huge mud mound. [goblins]
...

;goblins
1,[6d10] *goblins* live here, led by one they call [goblin].
5,[6d10] *goblins* live here, led by one they call [goblin]. The goblins have tamed [2d6] [goblin companions]. Goblins love to ride these into battle.

;goblin companions
2,*giant wolves*
1,*giant weasels*
1,*giant spiders*
1,*giant beetles*

;goblin
1,Death Rider
1,Man Killer
1,Eye Poker
1,Wolf King
1,Beetle Basher
1,The Impaler

Example output:

1202: On one of the islands of this swamp there is a huge mud mound. 40 goblins live here, led by one they call Man Killer. The goblins have tamed 6 giant wolves. Goblins love to ride these into battle.
2001: On one of the islands of this swamp there is a huge mud mound. 34 goblins live here, led by one they call The Impaler.

Success!

Tags:

Comments on 2018-03-17 Random Goblins

If you made two tables out of the goblin leader table, you could have “man king” or “the rider” etc.

Rorschachhamster 2018-03-18 23:22 UTC


Hilarious. Death Killer!

Done.

– Alex Schroeder 2018-03-19 09:50 UTC

Add Comment

More...

Comments


Please make sure you contribute only your own work, or work licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. Note: in order to facilitate peer review and fight vandalism, we will store your IP number for a number of days. See Privacy Policy for more information. See Info for text formatting rules. You can edit the comment page if you need to fix typos. You can subscribe to new comments by email without leaving a comment.

To save this page you must answer this question:

Please say HELLO.